Teenage dating emotional abuse

People who are abused often feel like it's their fault — that they "asked for it" or that they don't deserve any better. Help your friend understand that it is not his or her fault. The person who is being abusive has a serious problem and needs professional help.

A friend who is being abused needs you to listen and support without judging. Your friend also needs your encouragement to get help immediately from an adult, such as a parent, family member, or health professional.

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They may be embarrassed or ashamed, and may blame themselves. Tell them that you are concerned for their safety and well-being and that you are there for them.

They may be afraid their parents will make them break up, convinced that it is their fault or that their parents will blame them or be disappointed in them, and afraid of losing privileges. Ask them what they would like to have happen..can you help them be safe. Educate yourself—access online resources, read, call Caring Unlimited for information and/or support for yourself!

Dating abuse happens to young people from every socio-economic group regardless of race, religion, academic ability or economic background. Use clear language to describe what you see is happening.

Tactics used in youth dating abuse include one or more of the following: There are many reasons why teens don’t tell parents about the abuse. Acknowledge that they are in a very difficult and scary situation.

If you think you're in an abusive relationship, it's time to get out of it.

Last modified 11-Jan-2020 01:27